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Book Writing - The Start

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Well, this is the tricky part: The Start. What to say? Where to begin? You sat down eagerly in front of your computer, or perhaps with some paper and a pen, ready to et your brilliant idea that's going to change the way society views literature forever...when you suddenly realise that that blank white page looks so, what's the word? Oh yeah, empty.

Many writers consider the start to be the hardest part of writing a book, mainly due to the fact that there's nothing whatsoever on the page. Once you have started, you can re-read parts of what you've written earlier and start thinking of new ideas for your characters, but for now you just have to come with something for them to do all by yourself. Just write down anything, a few paragraphs setting the scene and describing the characters is a good start. It doesn't have to be action-packed right from the start, but make sure that you give the reader the impression that something is going to happen soon, otherwise they'll get bored and may even stop reading. So for starters, just scribble anything down to set your writing wheels in motion.

The key point to remember when writing the start is this (and something that I struggle to keep in mind): This is not an English test at school, where you have a set time limit, and once you've written the opening few paragraphs on the paper it's virtually impossible to scribble bits in, cross things out, move whole paragraphs around etc. without making the whole thing look a mess and having to start again. With your book there's no rush. Don't think that once you've written the start then that's it set in stone forever; you can change it at any time while you write. It may sound strange, but one idea is to write the middle before the beginning. Start writing the main action which will appear in the middle of your book, and then go back and write your introduction. That way you know exactly what's going to happen in your novel and therefore this approach allows you to drop hints in the beginning of your story about what your reader can look forward to later on in the book.

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